150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM: Week 16 Wrap Up

By Jennifer Smith Gray on June 4, 2017 under CanWomenSTEM150

There continues to be a gender gap in STEM fields in Canada.

To try to change this, we can tell girls and young women that they are equal to boys and men and that they can do all the same things that boys and men can do. We can tell them that they can have careers and make an impact in STEM fields. We can point them, even nudge them, towards science, technology, engineering, and math education.

But our words might not be enough. These girls and young women need to see the link between themselves and STEM fields. They need to be able to envision themselves there. Gender-based stereotypes are reinforced for them unless they actually see something different. They need to be able to identify with the work being done in STEM fields and connect it to their own lives.

At hEr VOLUTION, we believe strongly in the notion that these girls need role models. According to Webster’s dictionary, a role model is “a person whose behaviour in a particular role is imitated by others.”  hEr VOLUTION strives to connect the next generation of women in STEM with role models in STEM careers — women whose behaviour these girls can imitate in order achieve their own success. Through these role models, the girls and young women receive mentoring, guidance, inspiration, and connections to the industries. They see in action the words that they hear — that there is a place for them in STEM fields.

The 150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM #CanWomenSTEM150 social media campaign is all about role models. Week after week, we strive to bring attention to the stories of some Canadian women role models in a wide variety of STEM fields.

On July 15th, we’re offering the opportunity for girls and young women to meet with some of these role models, to mingle, to gather advice for success, and to be inspired to reach for their own dreams. Consider donating the registration cost for a student to attend the Canadian Women in STEM Conference. That student might meet or hear directly from from the role model who will inspire her to take big steps forward in STEM.

If you missed the six role models who we introduced this week, you can read their profiles now:


Get your tickets today for the Canadian Women in STEM Conference on July 15th!

Between now and July 15, follow hEr VOLUTION’s 150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter
 to read unique and inspiring stories of Canada’s females who are having an impact in STEM.

Re-post and share and forward!

 Learn more about 150 Days of  Canadian Women in Stem.

Visit the blog for a wrap up of the featured stories each week. 

Use hashtag #CanWomenSTEM150 to help us spread the share these women’s stories.



6 STEM Activities Kids Would Want to Get Into This Summer

By Catherine Chea on May 30, 2017 under #STEM4Every1

Now that school’s almost out, it’s time for some STEM fun!

STEM? Fun? What!?

I’m not kidding. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) can go hand in hand with fun—it doesn’t have to be boring. And I can tell you that from my own experience.

When I was young, I had to complete math exercises over the summer in order to get ahead in school. At the time, math was the antithesis of fun. I hated it. I even remembered my cousin used to help me cheat so that we had more time for play.

But somehow, I got myself liking math—and even a little coding—in ways that I wouldn’t have imagined. For instance, through playing Neopets, a virtual pet community where users can personalize their shops and create a guild through coding, I learned some basic HTML. From building an ice cream sundae with multiplications, I looked forward to studying for math after school.

Nowadays, there are even more ways for kids to get into STEM. Below are just a few ideas to try over the break:

1. Create your own science experiment

Whether it’s creating fireworks in a jar or making tissue paper fly with static electricity, kids can learn first-hand the laws of physics and chemistry through getting their hands wet and experimenting with household products. For activities such as these, parental supervision is highly recommended, especially when dealing with hazardous materials. For inspiration, have a look at sites such as Little Bins for Little Hands and Kidspot.

2. Play board games

Board games are not only great activities to engage with family and friends, it also stimulates the brain. Many board games encourage players to think in terms of logic and probability in order to make a strategic move. What better way to exercise those brains cells, while socializing at the same time, than to play a game of Quirkle or Code Monkey Island?

3. Read books

I was visiting Indigo the other day and I stumbled across an entire section of books devoted to STEM for kids. I couldn’t help myself from taking a few photos of this delightful new selection. These books look fun to read (and yes, I’m one of those people who does judge a book by its cover). But I did flip through them. The visuals and storyline of some of these books, such as Women in Science, Girl Code, and Ada, Twist Science definitely caught my attention. And based on the reviews on Goodreads, I’ve heard good things about them too.

4. Play video games

It’s possible to learn math and play video games at the same time. In fact, with games such as Prodigy, kids would want to rush home to do their “homework.” Prodigy is a free E-learning game, where players interact in a fantasy world solving math problems. As well, the game is specifically designed to improve children’s performance in school and is aligned with the school curriculum for Grades 1-8. The game also includes a reporting feature, so parents and teachers can track their children’s progress.

5. Explore the neighbourhood

With nicer and warmer weather, there’s no excuse not to leave the house. There are so many places, such as museums, aquariums, the Biosphère, and the Ontario Science Centre, to explore—where you learn about biodiversity, dinosaurs, the environment and more.

6. Attend a STEM conference

While most conferences are for adults, there are also ones where youth can attend. For instance, youth are encouraged to attend the upcoming Canadian Women in STEM Conference, featuring female role models in STEM. These prominent speakers will share their success stories—and, perhaps, even inspire your child’s future.

The event will take place on Sunday, July 15, 2017, in Toronto. Click here to learn more about the event.

150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM: Week 15 Wrap Up

By Jennifer Smith Gray on May 28, 2017 under CanWomenSTEM150

We are pretty excited these days at hEr VOLUTION. Have we told you why?

Have we mentioned how thrilled we are about the success of the ongoing 150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM campaign? We received an overwhelming number of nominations of #CanWomenSTEM150 women to introduce on social media each week, and we continue receive great feedback from our audience and support from other women in STEM. The daily profiles of women who have achieved success in STEM have sparked conversations, led to partnerships and relationships, and inspired other women step up as advocates. Goal achieved (and we’re not done yet)!

And have we mentioned how excited we are for the concluding event, the Canadian Women in STEM Conference, on July 15th? This event will build on the momentum from the #CanWomenSTEM150 social media campaign and help to support diversity and close the gender gap for women in STEM. Attendees will hear directly from some of the women they’ve been reading about over the months of the online campaign.

       

But have we told you about our awesome sponsors who provide us with ongoing support and who are helping the conference take shape? We would not be able to pull off such an important event, with such an exciting panel of speakers, without the help of the following generous sponsors:

Finally, let us tell you, none of this would be possible without the dedication of successful women in STEM in Canada, such as these six women that we introduced on social media this week:

  • Dr. Joël Dickinson, associate professor in psychology head of the psychology department at Laurentian University

  • Charlotte Fischer, physicist who created software for calculating atomic structure

  • Samantha Yammine, PhD candidate in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto

  • Skai Spooner, digital communications technology specialist

  • Karen Lopez, award-winning blogger, professor, and UX designer

  • Aerin Jacob, ecologist and conservation scientist


Get your tickets today for the Canadian Women in STEM Conference on July 15th!

Between now and July 15, follow hEr VOLUTION’s 150 Days of Canadian Women in STEM on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter
 to read unique and inspiring stories of Canada’s females who are having an impact in STEM.

Re-post and share and forward!

 Learn more about 150 Days of  Canadian Women in Stem.

Visit the blog for a wrap up of the featured stories each week. 

Use hashtag #CanWomenSTEM150 to help us spread the share these women’s stories.